Search

Do Our Biases Affect Our Financial Choices?



Even the most seasoned investors are prone to their influence


Provided by Derek Cockrell


Investors are routinely warned about allowing their emotions to influence their decisions. However, they are less routinely cautioned about their preconceptions and biases that may color their financial choices.

In a battle between the facts & biases, our biases may win. If we acknowledge this tendency, we may be able to avoid some unexamined choices when it comes to personal finance. It may actually "pay" to recognize blind spots and biases with investing. Here are some common examples of bias creeping into our financial lives.

Letting emotions run the show. An investor thinks, "I got a great return from that decision," instead of thinking, "that was a good decision because ______."1


“In a battle between the facts & biases, our biases may win. If we acknowledge this tendency, we may be able to avoid some unexamined choices when it comes to personal finance.”

How many investment decisions do we make that have a predictable outcome? Hardly any. In retrospect, it is all too easy to prize the gain from a decision over the wisdom of the decision, and to, therefore, believe that the findings with the best outcomes were the best decisions (not necessarily true). Putting some distance between your impulse to make a change and the action you want to take to help get some distance from your emotions.1

Valuing facts we "know" & "see" more than "abstract" facts. Information that seems abstract may seem less valid or valuable than information that relates to personal experience. This is true when we consider different types of investments, the state of the markets, and the economy's health.2

Valuing the latest information most. In the investment world, the latest news is often more valuable than old news. But when the latest news is consistently good (or consistently bad), memories of previous market climate(s) may become too distant. If we are not careful, our minds may subconsciously dismiss the eventual emergence of the next bear (or bull) market.2

Being overconfident. The more experienced we are at investing, the more confidence we have about our investment choices. When the market is going up, and a clear majority of our investment choices work out well, this reinforces our confidence, sometimes to a point where we may start to feel we can do little wrong, thanks to the state of the market, our investing acumen, or both. This can be dangerous.3

The herd mentality. You know how this goes: if everyone is doing something, they must be doing it for sound and logical reasons. The herd mentality is what leads many investors to buy high (and sell low). It can also promote panic selling. The advent of social media hasn't helped with this idea. Above all, it encourages market timing, and when investors try to time the market, they frequently realize subpar returns.4

Sometimes, asking ourselves what our certainty is based on and reflecting about ourselves can be a helpful and informative step. Examining our preconceptions may help us as we invest.


Derek Cockrell may be reached at (575) 769-3965 x101 or Derek@ContemporaryBenefitsLLC.com

www.ContemporaryBenefitsLLC.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.


Citations

1. CNBC.com, September 28, 2020

2. Forbes.com, March 26, 2020

3. Forbes.com, March 19, 2020

4. CNBC.com, June 26, 2020

3 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Contact

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • LinkedIn
  • Black Twitter Icon

Mailing Address:

PO Box 1083

Clovis, NM  88102

Supervisory Office:

6000 Uptown Blvd NE, Ste. 100

Albuquerque, NM  87110

​​

Tel: 575-769-3965

Fax: 575-769-1489

derek@contemporarybenefitsllc.com

marli@contemporarybenefitsllc.com

jessica@contemporarybenefitsllc.com

Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Contemporary Benefits, LLC, and Cambridge are not affiliated. 

This is not an offer of securities in any jurisdiction, nor is it specifically directed to a resident of any jurisdiction.  As with any security, request a prospectus from your Registered Representative.  Read it carefully before you invest or send money.  A Representative from Contemporary Benefits, LLC will contact you to provide requested information.  Investment Professionals of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc. do not provide tax or legal advice in their roles as Registered Representatives.  Please consult your tax advisor or attorney regarding your situation.  Securities products are limited to residents of New Mexico and Texas.

© Pages, Images, and Videos Copyright Protected
Broker check transparent.png